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Documents/newfoundland/beautiful snow drifts on cape spear.pdf 

 

TOWING ICEBERGS OFF NEWFOUNDLAND 

                          

 

PHOTOS AND COMMENT BY  PADDY WELLS,  Chief Engineer M.V. Atlantic Kestrel 

TOWING ICEBERGS OFF NEWFOUNDLAND 

 

Description of each picture. TOP ) My vessel the Atlantic Kestrel shooting a rocket with an small line attached so the Atlantic Merlin can pull the blue tow line to her deck. When the line is attached,  The Atlantic Merlin will maneuver around the berg, then both vessels will connect the tow line to their winches. then the vessels will start towing the berg. On the Atlantic Kestrel Deck you can see the Anchors that were remove from the Oil Rig West Aquarius in case the rig has to move. if we can not move the iceberg from rig's path.

Bottom Left:  Shows that the same iceberg has 2 towers you and see that they are connected under water. Thi berg weighs about 20 million tons and  only 1 /10 is above the sea.  Bottom  centre: While  the iceberg being towed it towed it struck the ocean floor causing the iceberg to roll over  over completely.

Bottom Right: one  oil oil rigs  operating on the Hibernia Oil Fileds that need protection from Icebergs.

 

wind in recreational forests

Trees for amenity, shelter, and-bioenergy, in-Wind shaped  Forests  and  related principles of directionality  and fractals 

 and  science and tech publications related to Newfoundland  

  Most of the wind studies of wind in the landscape by other scholars tend to focus on so-called wildness of landscapes. But throughout the Wind Reader PDF series  there are articles on, and frequent reference to, the host's small suburban garden. While the ROBERSTON GARDEN page is a slide show illustrating how the garden was built up literally from bedrock, its biodiversity was designed primarily to control wind and snow; thus the lengthening the plant growing season and outdoor comfort within our microclimate; while in winter, it restricts  snow drifting in very windy and exceptionally snowy circumstances. However, many of the lessons about climate-proofing gardens

was learned from the Nature of the Newfoundland wilderness; i.e., the forests and the barrens.          valley  flora-of-peatlands   waterford Beautiful snow patterns tell us much about the great variety of turbulence within and around structures great and small, hard and soft  across flat and rough terrain 

 

wave forests of Newfoundland  dynamic landscape  Grates cove stone walls

erioderma pedicellatum  cultivated tree species  icebergs around the Avalon  water power sawmills   

  lanse au meadows  marklands forests list of trees and shrub in Newfoundland beautiful living windbreaks birches of , history of the classification of the genus carex  flora-of-peatlands    history of the classification of the genus carex.  cultivated willows 

By European standards, the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador is a vast, sparsely populated area that is 1.4 times larger as Iceland and Britain combined.
Vast as the province is, it is more efficient to study the wind, flora and many interesting natural and urban features in  the landscape because, like Iceland, there is, for the most part, an unbridle freedom to roam the wilderness that one does not have in Britain. And while Scotland and the settled areas of Iceland are ideal forstudyingwind in cultivated landscapes, there is much to study in the natural landscapes in the hinterland of Newfoundland and Labrador. While your host has done some studies in Labrador, the only study pertaining to wind and landscape was along the south coast of Labrador from Red Bay to Lance Aux Clair (where there is a unique wave clonal tuckamore (krummholz). Most of my studies of wind and landscape (and many other topics) were done throughout Newfoundland - hence the title of this page. Here are a few of my studies on the natural environment of Newfoundland            

                 

Photographs of Newfoundland

by

Alexander Robertson

St. John's 

 

 

 

Xray of tree samples from the Spirity Cove, Wave Forest in north west Newfoundland (source:- Impact of Wind on a Balsam Fir wave forest, by Alexander Roberson. D. Phil. Thesis, Oxford University.
A beautiful mansion at Salmon Cove, Victoria, Newfoundland
A growler (called a bergy bit) trapped in Quidi Vidi, St. John's. Two hardy swimmers climbed onto berg one of them is just barely visible as a tiny dot on the water close to the right edge.
A fine trail in Frenchmans Cove, Bay Roberts with spectular sea cliffs
Port Kirwan
Icicles, South Side Road, St. John's
Beautiful rock below the Ferryland Lighthouse, Newfoundland.
Hearts Content, Newfoundland
Government House, Newfoundland
Mount Pearl
Duck Pond, Mount Pearl, Newfoundland
Salmon Leap on the Exploits River, Grand Falls
Steady Brook Golf course, near Cornerbrook, Newfoundland
L'Anse au Meadows norse site, Newfoundland
Traces of the Norse site at L'anse au Meadows.
Carmanville, Newfoundland
Barbara from Iceland on the Gros Morne trail
Zoomporphic Tree stump
Zoomortphic tree trunk Gros Morn
This is a gentleman is true cross-canada cyclist.
Walkway to Western Brook Pond, Grose Morn National Park
Western Brook Pond Gros Morne National Park
Western Brook Pond Gros Morne National Park
Frencman's Cove Bay Roberts
Signal Hill Trail. St. John's
Old Perlican
Pitcher Plants, Old Perlican, Newfoundland
Port Blandford
Port Kirwan, east Avalon Peninsula
Beautifull Icebergs off Calvert, Newfoundland by Paul Duggan
More Icebergs off the southeast coast of the Avalon Peninsula photographed by Paul Duggan.
A sea stack near Western Beach, topped with hardy and healthy Balsam fir Newfoundland. I call it a mop-top.
Waterford River. St. John's
Waterford River, St. John's
A weeping tamarack (Larix laricena (pendula) on the south side road trail St. John's
Snow Drifts Cape Spear
Iceland Forestry Association planating a tree at Government House
Government House, St. John's
Government House, St. John's
St. John's from the Southside Hill
The Battery and Signal Hill
Iceland Forestry Association Tour of Newfoundland 2010
During my research on short rotation energy plantations based on willow i was able to grow willows at a phenomeal rate such as this 1-year Salix petandra shoot, one of three shorter shoots on a 4-yr. old coppiced stool.
My collection of Willows for trials on short-rotation biomass energy willows provided a good source for my botanical drawings.
The best way to learn plants is to illustrate them. In this case one of many clones of willows from my collection of short-rotation willows for biomass energy
A peculiar tri-flowered Cornus canadensis (Crackerberry)
Cape St. Mary Bird Sanctuary
Cape St. Mary Gannet Colony
Cape St. Mary Bird Sanctuary
Cape St.Mary Bird Sanctuary
Signal Hill December 28/2014